Gravestones to die for

snow churchyardI was puttering around the internet this morning doing some research on the proper names for different types of gravestone (because that’s the cheery sort of person I am). I didn’t necessarily get very far, but I’ve come back with all sorts of eye-opening bits and pieces.

Like this…

How’s this for trivia: the sticky-outy bit on older, traditionally shaped stones are called the “shoulders” – or occasionally, the “wings”. How did I not already know that?

Trivia 2: “taphophilia” is a love of funerals or the funereal, including “tombstone tourism”. (So many thoughts, right there…)

Anyway, I also came across a few links that I thought were kind of cool, so.

- There’s the Urbanist’s piece on 10 Types of Tombstone to Die For… (just look at the Knights of Malta one!)
- CNN’s Most Scenic Cemeteries piece; and Departful’s take on the same idea
- How to read a gravestone using a mirror
Twelve unusual tombs

And, if you’ve the good fortune to not have suffered through my ramblings for very long, there’s always the Resurrection Cheese

 

One comment

  1. I have always been fascinated with cemeteries and have been to a fare few in my time to take photos and get some peace and quiet. I think it is the idea of looking at other peoples beliefs and also imagining faces to match the, sometimes, obscure epithets. Out of the ’10 most scenic cemeteries’, I have been to three; Père-Lachaise, Paris, the Old Jewish Cemetery, Prague and Highgate, London.

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